Ritzman Riesling

Ritzman RieslingWe’ve been checking out a lot of riesling lately, so let’s continue that trend with another one from the Mosel province in Germany.
This wine is part of the Bronco Wine Companionship portfolio, which is probably best known as the producer or “Two Buck Chuck” but is also the companionship in the rear 50+ additional bargain wine brands.  If there’s an ultra-cheap wine that you really like, there’s a excellent chance that wine comes from Bronco. Read more

Fritz’s Riesling

Fritz’s RieslingOne of the things that bums me out about the US wine scene (for lack of a better term) is how so many people dislike riesling — or at least reckon they dislike it.  But it’s really a wine that’s not well understood by many people, particularly in the US.  I too have been guilty of this in the past.  I attribute this misunderstanding mostly to domestic riesling.  There are some excellent domestic rieslings, so I don’t want to paint in really broad strokes, but there are plenty that leave something to be desired.
I’ve heard many consumers complain about American riesling being too sweet.  But this is just an example of how many consumers don’t be with you riesling.  The problem isn’t necessarily the sweetness, it’s the fact that that sweetness isn’t balanced with acid.  And let’s be apparent, not all rieslings are sweet.  Rieslings from any province can run the gamut from bone dry to syrupy sweet.
In my opinion, if you want to be with you and appreciate riesling, you should really start with ancient world rieslings from Germany, Austria and the Alsace province of France.  They just tend to be more consistently well balanced than many of their American counterparts.  While some of these ancient world rieslings can get pricey, there are subdue plenty of fantastic deals to be found.  And that takes us to a German riesling called Fritz’s Riesling. Read more