Schloss Reinhartshausen Old Vines Riesling

Schloss Reinhartshausen Old Vines RieslingI have an thought.  How about another riesling review?
This one from the impossible-for-any-American-to-spell-correctly Schloss Reinhartshausen winery in Rheingau, Germany.  Those who’ve been conception our additional recent riesling reviews will know that Rheingau is the province along the River Rhine. Read more

Fritz’s Riesling

Fritz’s RieslingOne of the things that bums me out about the US wine scene (for lack of a better term) is how so many people dislike riesling — or at least reckon they dislike it.  But it’s really a wine that’s not well understood by many people, particularly in the US.  I too have been guilty of this in the past.  I attribute this misunderstanding mostly to domestic riesling.  There are some excellent domestic rieslings, so I don’t want to paint in really broad strokes, but there are plenty that leave something to be desired.
I’ve heard many consumers complain about American riesling being too sweet.  But this is just an example of how many consumers don’t be with you riesling.  The problem isn’t necessarily the sweetness, it’s the fact that that sweetness isn’t balanced with acid.  And let’s be apparent, not all rieslings are sweet.  Rieslings from any province can run the gamut from bone dry to syrupy sweet.
In my opinion, if you want to be with you and appreciate riesling, you should really start with ancient world rieslings from Germany, Austria and the Alsace province of France.  They just tend to be more consistently well balanced than many of their American counterparts.  While some of these ancient world rieslings can get pricey, there are subdue plenty of fantastic deals to be found.  And that takes us to a German riesling called Fritz’s Riesling. Read more

Groebe Aulerde Westhofen Riesling

Groebe Aulerde Westhofen RieslingLast week we reviewed a nice — and very affordable — German riesling from the Rheinhessen province, Fritz’s Riesling.  And tonight we’re checking out another riesling from the Rheinhessen province.
The Weingut Groebe estate was established way back in 1625, so these folks have been building riesling for more than a few years.  You might notice that the marks on these wines say 1763, and that is the year the family started bearing the coat of arms — which is also on their marks.  I’ve always wanted a coat of arms, but no luck for me there.  Oh sure, I’ve gotten the random junk mail tiresome to sell me my “official” family coat of arms, but I’m not that gullible.  In the case of Groebe, the coat of arms is legit.  And it includes the cross of St. Andrew’s in it, which is an ancient Christian character for wine.
But moving further than the coat of arms, I know you’re interested in the wine.  And this particular one is excellent.  Really excellent.  OK, it’s brilliant! Read more

Dessert Wine

history of wine german wine culture of wine consuming wine  %tages Dessert WineDessert wines are sweet wines usually served with dessert.

A dessert wine is considered to be any sweet wine drunk with a meal, as opposed to the white fortified wines drunk before the meal, and the red fortified wines drunk after it. Thus, most fortified wines are compared as distinct from dessert wines.

In the United States, oppositely, a dessert wine is legally defined as any wine over 14% alcohol by volume, which includes all fortified wines. This dates back to a time when the US wine industry only made dessert wines by fortification, but such a classification is outdated now that modern yeast and viticulture can produce dry wines over 15% without fortification.

German dessert wines can contain half that amount of alcohol.

Winemakers want to produce a dessert wine containing high levels of both sugar and alcohol, yet the alcohol is made from sugar. There are many ways to increase sugar levels in the final wine:

  • Grow grapes so that they naturally have sugar to spare for both sweetness and alcohol.
  • Add alcohol before all the sugar is fermented, this is called fortification, or 'mutage'.
  • Add sugar.
  • Remove water to concentrate the sugar.

Honey was added to wine in early Roman times Continue reading

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Rothschilds And Wine

“My grandfather was the only Rothschild who detested being referred to as a businessman,” says Julien de Beaumarchais de Rothschild. He’s the baron’s heir and with his 77-year-old mother, Baroness Philippine de Rothschild, owns privately held Baron Philippe de Rothschild SA, which he says annually produces between 100,000 and 150,000 bottles of the Bordeaux first-growth Pauillac Chateau Mouton Rothschild.Baron Rothschild Read more

Famous Wine Quotes 2

"It seems to me that there are three things that have changed in the wine world. First, the wine rich got richer and the wine poor got poorer. By which I mean that wine prices have polarized beyond belief. Twenty years ago I drank the greatest wines of the world all the time. (I was a wine merchant and a restaurateur, and it was my job, darn it.)" --- the late Lee Evans of Australia, 1996.

"Wine experts can’t resist making predictions. In 1990, wine lover Richard Nixon prophesied that the Chinese would someday match the French in the quality of their wines; this despite a Chinese carte des vins that featured sweet red wine and a grape called Cow’s Nipple. In the mid-1980s, a well-known New York wine merchant asserted that an $8 Cabernet from Chile was as good as Lafite, and auction prices would eventually reflect this little-known fact. Wine coolers too, as I recall, were expected to expose a vast new market to the pleasures of wine drinking. The coolers bombed, [a nice bottle of Lafite will set you back $250 or more], and Chilean cabernet is still mostly eight bucks." --- Stephen Tanzer, Forbes, May 6, 1996
other history of wine culture of wine  %tages Famous Wine Quotes 2
“Hemingway is great in that alone of living writers he has saturated his work with the memory of physical pleasure, with sunshine and salt water, with food, wine and making love and the remorse which is the shadow of that sun.” --- Cyril Connolly, The Unquiet Grave, 1951.

"Clearly, the pleasures wines afford are transitory, but so are those of the ballet or of a musical performance. Wine is inspiring and adds greatly to the joy of living." --- Napoleon

On drinking the wines of Bordeaux: “The French drink them young, so a Socialist government won’t take them. The English drink them old, so they can show their friends cobwebs and dusty bottles. The American drink them exactly when they are ready, because they don’t know any better.” --- Anonymous

"For in the hand of the Lord there is a cup, and the wine is red." --- Psalms 75:8

Making good wine is a skill; making fine wine is Continue reading

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Famouse Wine Quotes

"Penicillin cures, but wine makes people happy." --- Alexander Fleming (1881-1955), the Scottish bacteriologist credited with discovering Penicillin in 1928.

"Wine is the most civilized thing in the world." --- Ernest Hemingway.

"Wine improves with age. The older I get, the better I like it." --- Anonymous
"Compromises are for relationships, not wine." --- Sir Robert Scott Caywood

"Beer is made by men, wine by God!" --- Martin Luther

"Drinking good wine with good food in good company is one of life's most civilized pleasures."--- Michael Broadbent

"Wine makes daily living easier, less hurried, with fewer tensions and more tolerance." --- Benjamin Franklin

[at his first sip of champagne] "Come quickly! I am tasting stars!" --- Dom Perignon

"Men are like wine - some turn to vinegar, but the best improve with age." --- Pope John XXIII

"Alonso of Aragon was wont to say in commendation of age, that 'age appears to be best in four things - old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read.'" --- Francis Bacon, 1624
history of wine culture of wine  %tages Famouse Wine Quotes
"I cook with wine; sometimes I even add it to the food." --- W. C. Fields

"Wine is life." --- Petronius, Roman writer

"He who aspires to be a serious wine drinker must drink claret." (“claret” is the British term for red Bordeaux) --- Samuel Johnson

"Nothing makes the future look so rosy as to contemplate it through a glass of Chambertin." --- Napoleon

"No nation is drunken where wine is cheap, and none sober where the dearness of wine substitutes ardent spirits as the common beverage." --- Continue reading

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